Master of Arts in Mathematics Teaching

Designed for working professionals who wish to pursue an advanced degree while continuing their work with students and teachers. Course assignments have immediate application in school settings and support the work of teachers, coaches, and instructional specialists.

Engaging

Participate in meaningful activities that push your mathematical thinking and deepen your understanding. Work with colleagues from around the world who are deeply interested in the learning and teaching of mathematics.

Credible

The program and course materials are designed and taught by nationally recognized and award winning educational leaders who have years of classroom teaching experience in the K-12 system.

Practical

Grounded in classroom experience and examples of student thinking, the coursework has immediate application in your work setting.

Relevant

Successful implementation of the CCSSM requires educators who can take on leadership, coaching, and math specialist roles in their systems. The Master of Arts in Mathematics Teaching program gives you the knowledge and skills necessary for these roles.

Convenient

Our blended program is designed around working professionals’ schedules so you can balance career, academic, and life responsibilities while completing your degree. You have the option of traveling to Mount Holyoke College to attend the summer sessions or you can attend online through our new Virtual Learning Environment. Our academic year courses are all done online.

Application Process

Click on the Apply Today link below to access our online application. You will be asked to create an account profile and will be assigned a PIN that you will use to login to the application website. When selecting the program, choose “Master of Arts in Mathematics Teaching (MAMT)”. If you have any problems applying please contact our director, Michael Flynn at mflynn@mtholyoke.edu

Apply Today

About the Program

The Master of Arts in Mathematics Teaching degree (MAMT) offered by the Mathematics Leadership Programs of Mount Holyoke College is designed for teachers, teacher-leaders and math coaches of grades K – 8 who have their teacher certification and bachelor degree and would like to develop their professional credentials in order to become qualified as Math Specialists.

Math Specialists provide a full range of support to the teachers in their school districts by: offering coaching programs or in-classroom support for teachers; designing and facilitating professional development seminars; interpreting data from a variety of student and district assessments; participating in district decision-making regarding the system plan for math instruction; and developing local assessment and evaluation instruments. The MAMT degree would offer teachers of grades K -8 the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to take on these new professional responsibilities.

THE PROGRAM
This program is built around the latest research and best practices in math education today. The core component of the work is the Developing Mathematical Ideas Curriculum. MAMT involves three years of non-residential summer programs (3 weeks each) and two academic years of online work.

Each summer will consist of 3 weeks of institutes, 2 focused on mathematics and 1 focused on educational leadership. Students can attend in person at Mount Holyoke College or online through our Virtual Leaning Environment for the summer sessions.

Each academic year will include 4 credits of mathematics work and a 4-credit educational leadership program, all conducted online. The academic year online courses blend asynchronous assignments with live Virtual Learning Sessions.

In total, the MAMT degree will be based on 18 credits of on campus work in the summer and 16 credits of on-line work completed during the academic year for a total of 34 credits. The tuition for the complete program is $24,500 and is broken into 3 payments: $10,088 for year one; $10,088 for year 2; and $4,324 for the final summer. There are no hidden fees.

Courses in Mathematics
MAMT consists of 20 credits in mathematics content and 14 credits of educational leadership courses. The core curriculum of the math courses is based on the Developing Mathematical Ideas (DMI) and Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra (CAA) Professional Development Materials.

Developing Mathematical Ideas (DMI) is a professional development curriculum designed to help teachers think through the major ideas of K-8 mathematics and examine how children develop those ideas. At the heart of the materials are sets of classroom episodes (cases) illustrating student thinking as described by their teachers. In addition to case discussions, the curriculum offers teachers opportunities to explore mathematics in lessons led by facilitators, to share and discuss the work of their own students, to view and discuss video clips of mathematics classrooms, to examine the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice, to analyze lessons taken from innovative elementary mathematics curricula, and to read overviews of related research.

DMI seminars are designed to bring together teachers from kindergarten through middle grades to:

  • learn mathematics content
  • learn to recognize key mathematical ideas with which their students are grappling
  • learn to support the power and complexity of student thinking
  • learn how core mathematical ideas develop across the grades
  • learn how to continue learning about children and mathematics

There are seven DMI modules each devoted to a different set of coherent mathematical ideas:

  1. Number and Operations, Part 1: Building a System of Tens: Calculating with Whole Numbers and Decimals. Participants explore the base-ten structure of the number system, consider how that structure is exploited in multidigit computational procedures, and examine how basic concepts of whole numbers reappear when working with decimals.
  2. Number and Operations, Part 2: Making Meaning for Operations: In the Domains of Whole Numbers and Fractions. Participants examine the actions and situations modeled by the four basic operations, beginning with a view of young children’s counting strategies as they encounter word problems, moving to an examination of the four basic operations on whole numbers, and revisiting the operations in the context of rational numbers.
  3. Geometry: Examining Features of Shape. Participants examine aspects of 2D and 3D shapes, develop geometric vocabulary, and explore both definitions and properties of geometric objects. The study includes angle, similarity, congruence, and the relationships between 3D objects and their 2D representations.
  4. Geometry: Measuring Space in One, Two, and Three Dimensions. Participants examine different attributes of size, develop facility in composing and decomposing shapes, and apply these skills to make sense of formulas for area and volume. They also explore conceptual issues of length, area, and volume, as well as their complex inter-relationships.
  5. Working with Data. Participants work with the collection, representation, and interpretation of data. They learn what various graphs and statistical measures show about features of the data, study how to summarize data when comparing groups, and consider whether the data provide insight into the questions that led to data collection.
  6. Number and Operations, Part 3: Reasoning Algebraically about Operations. Participants examine generalizations at the heart of the study of operations in the elementary grades. They express these generalizations in common language and in algebraic notation, develop arguments based on representations of the operations, study what it means to prove a generalization, and extend their generalizations and arguments when the domain under consideration expands from whole numbers to integers.
  7. Patterns, Functions, and Change. Participants discover how the study of repeating patterns and number sequences can lead to ideas of functions, learn how to read tables and graphs to interpret phenomena of change, and use algebraic notation to write function rules. With a particular emphasis on linear functions, participants also explore quadratic and exponential functions and examine how various features of a function are seen in graphs, tables, or rules.

Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra (CAA) is a professional development experience in which teachers consider generalizations that arise from the study of number and operations in grades 1 through 7. They examine cases of students who are engaged in the process of articulating general claims, working to understand those claims, and learning how to prove them. The course also focuses on how this approach to mathematical thinking supports a range of mathematics learners, including those who have difficulty with grade-level mathematics and those who need additional challenge.

CAA focuses on ideas that students encounter during their study of arithmetic using any curriculum materials. As students learn about the four basic operations—addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division—they frequently observe and comment upon regularities in the number system. For example, they may notice that the calculations 72-38 and 74-40 produce the same result, or that successive answers to a series of problems (10+1=?, 10+2=?, 10+3=?, …) increase by 1. Such regularities, emerging naturally from children’s work, lead to the study of generalizations about number and operations, as well as the practices of formulating, testing, and proving such generalizations—practices at the heart of early algebra.

Teachers will learn about particular pedagogical strategies to initiate and sustain students’ work on generalizations, record and write about the thinking of their students, and learn mathematics content for themselves. They will explore in depth the behavior of the four basic operations, develop a repertoire of representations for each of them, articulate generalizations in common language and in algebraic notation, and work on developing proofs.

Courses in Educational Leadership

Research on Learning: Implementing the Common Core Math Practice Standards

  • This course is focused on implementing mathematics instruction to support the development of conceptual understandings of mathematics. Topics include creating a classroom climate for productive mathematics discussion, posing open-ended math tasks, asking probing questions, and exploring teacher moves that both challenge and support individual student learning. Analyzing classroom cases of practice will be a key feature.

Action Research on Learning and Teaching

  • This course will include action research on the mathematics learning of students and pedagogical moves of teachers. Participants will produce written cases of practice based on audio or videotaped classroom discussions and interviews with their own students. Participants will analyze their own cases and those of their colleagues to examine the learning of students and the impact of teacher moves. Course instructors will also provide individual feedback based on the classroom cases.

Educational Leadership I: Mathematics Coaching and Mentoring

  • Based on the book Cultivating a Math Coaching Practice, this course will provide participants with opportunities to examine cases of math coaching practice in order to develop skills in taking on coaching roles to support mathematics instruction.

Action Research on Coaching/Mentoring

  • This course will include action research on the impact of mathematics coaching and mentoring. Participants will produce written cases of math coaching practice based on audio or videotaped math coaching or mentoring sessions. Participants will analyze their own cases and those of their colleagues to examine the impact of coaching moves. Course instructors will also provide individual feedback based on the coaching cases.

Education Leadership II: Facilitating Professional Development

  • This course will provide opportunities for participants to develop skills and knowledge to enable them to design and implement professional development programs. Activities focus on four aspects: the importance of identifying key ideas and goals for PD, strategically using both small and whole group formats, an analysis of commercially and publically available PD modules, and opportunities to practice facilitation.

TIMELINE for Cohort III (Beginning Summer 2015)

Summer 2015
Includes three one-week institutes meeting from 8:30 to 4:30 on the campus of Mount Holyoke College:
July 6 – July 10: Building a System of Tens
July 13 – July 17: Making Meaning for Operations
July 20 – July 24: Research on Learning: Implementing the Common Core Math Practice Standards.

Academic Year 2015-2016
Conducted online
Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra (CAA)
Action Research on Learning and Teaching

Summer 2016
Includes three one-week institutes meeting from 8:30 to 4:30 on the campus of Mount Holyoke College:

Measuring Space in One, Two, Three Dimensions
Educational Leadership I: Mathematics Coaching and Mentoring
Working with Data

Academic Year 2016-2017
Conducted online
Reasoning Algebraically About Operations (RAO)
Action Research on Coaching/Mentoring

Summer 2017
Includes three one-week institutes meeting from 8:30 to 4:30 on the campus of Mount Holyoke College:

Patterns, Functions, and Change
Education Leadership II: Facilitating Professional Development
Examining Features of Shape

Application Process

Click on the Apply Today link below to access our online application. You will be asked to create an account profile and will be assigned a PIN that you will use to login to the application website. When selecting the program, choose “Master of Arts in Mathematics Teaching (MAMT).” If you have any problems applying please contact our director, Michael Flynn at mflynn@mtholyoke.edu

Completed applications are due by March 1, 2015 and will be accepted on a rolling basis until the program is full.

Acceptance letters will be sent as applications are approved.

Apply Today